Country Profile: Honduras

Although Honduras has no state religion, it is a predominantly Catholic country. According to official church record, Honduras is 96% Christian, but 88% of people self-identify as Christian. People in Honduras report low rates about their specific knowledge of corruption, but high levels of distrust of the government and police. Honduras ranks in the bottom... Continue Reading →

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Country Profile: India

Although India has no state religion, most people consider religion to be very important in their lives. According to official church record, India is 73% Hindu, 5% Christian, and 21% of people are official members of a church or religious organization. People express highest confidence in religious organizations, and the least confidence in the police... Continue Reading →

Country Profile: Philippines

The Philippines is predominantly Catholic country that considers religion to be very important. People in the Philippines report relatively tolerant ethics to cheating on taxes and accepting bribes. The perceived level of corruption in government institutions is much higher than in other public institutions such as the media, religious bodies, and NGOs. The Philippines has... Continue Reading →

Country Profile: United States

The United States is a predominantly Christian country where people regard religion as relatively important. Corruption indices show marked improvement over the past decade and indicate low institutional corruption, but surveys of the population show medium to high levels of perceived institutional corruption. The United States ranks well globally, but ranks mediocre compared to others... Continue Reading →

Country Profile: Peru

Peru is a predominantly Catholic country that regards religion as important. People in Peru report low tolerance for cheating on taxes and accepting bribes, but the perceived and reported level of corruption in important institutions is middle to high.  Peru consistently ranks in the bottom third of countries of reported and perceived corruption indices.

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